Zorgvliet Herenhuis


OPEN TIMES
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Hol
The public can now relish in the nostalgy of yesteryear while enjoying the unsurpassed beauty of the Banhoek Valley combined with a delectable gourmet cooking. Enjoy traditional Cape cooking with a modern interpretation.

The Zorgvliet Herenhuis is open for lunch and dinner from Tuesdays to Saterdays, Sunday dinner and Monday lunch. Bookings are advised.

The public can now relish in the nostalgy of yesteryear while enjoying the unsurpassed beauty of the Banhoek Valley combined with a delectable gourmet cooking. Enjoy traditional Cape cooking with a modern interpretation.
The original manor house on the Zorgvliet Wine Farm has been undergoing a transformation under the watchful eyes of architect Sakkie Rust. The painstaking restoration process started more than four years ago under the previous owner Peter Rhymer and Henry Kane.

This year the new manager Marietjie van der Merwe joined forces with Henry Kane to restore the old house to its former glory and it recently reopened its doors as the Herenhuis restaurant. The original homestead was saved from complete decay and specific attention was given to the conservation of existing structures.

The preservation of the ceilings, which were restored after exhaustive efforts, has lend a unique atmosphere to the restaurant. The Zorgvliet Herenhuis can once again boast with a thatch roof and has recaptured the romantic facade of years gone by. The driveway has been replanted with date palms to restore the original look of the house.

The previous time that the manor house was restored so meticulously was in 1860 after the house was virtually destroyed in a fire. The farm then belonged to Christiaan Frederik Beyers, father of the Boer General CF Beyers, who was born in the house in 1869 and later became the owner of the farm.

Local artist Robert Koch was commissioned to portray the breathtaking Banhoek Valley and the Zorgvliet Herenhuis in a series of seven paintings. These paintings now form an integral part of the atmosphere and grace each of the three eating rooms, namely the Banhoek Kitchen, the Beyers Room and the Bootmanskop Room, referring to the old Cape mariners.